May Second

Holy shit, Sam Winchester and I have the same birthday. Another reason this show is awesome.

ironcheflancaster:

wedonotpromoteviolence:

heirofspacecore:

sleek-black-wings:

thederpywingedone:

batmansymbol:

by the way did I ever tell y’all about the time I got a blank message from nobody, sent on new year’s eve in 1969, when the internet didn’t exist?
because that happened

What the fuck

Time travel.

Or maybe its from 2069, when we’ve developed the technology to send data to the past. You sent yourself a blank message as a test but as the email address you used to send it doesnt exist yet, it came up as no sender

I… what?

OKAY KIDS, LET’S LEARN ABOUT THE UNIX EPOCH
So back in the early days of computers, when we were trying to build clocks to keep all our computers in sync, we tried a bunch of different ways to synchronize them in ways that both normal people could use and programmers could utilize.
We just tried saying “The current time is THIS date” and just storing that date as some text, but while that was easy for humans, it was a bunch of different numbers that worked together in funny ways and computers don’t play nice with a bunch of random, arbitrary rules.
Not much worked, until we realized that we needed a BASELINE to compare against, and a way to represent the current time that covers everybody. So we came up with Unix time, because Unix was the style at the time. Essentially, Unix time represents any given time by saying “How many seconds ago was 12:00 AM on January 1, 1970 in Iceland somewhere?”. Recent enough to keep the numbers relatively small, far enough that nothing computer-y would fall before it, and consistent enough that there’d be no discrepancy based on where you are.
So what happens when you see the date “December 31, 1969” on a buggy message like this is that the computer received a bunch of zeroes by mistake and went “Oh, this must be a message!” Then when it tried to interpret it, it got to the date, found a zero, and said “Zero seconds since the Unix Epoch? I’ll round down - this was sent at the last second of New Year’s Eve, 1969! They’ll be so happy to finally get their blank message.”
And then the computer traipsed off on its merry way, because computers are fucking idiots.

ironcheflancaster:

wedonotpromoteviolence:

heirofspacecore:

sleek-black-wings:

thederpywingedone:

batmansymbol:

by the way did I ever tell y’all about the time I got a blank message from nobody, sent on new year’s eve in 1969, when the internet didn’t exist?

because that happened

What the fuck

Time travel.

Or maybe its from 2069, when we’ve developed the technology to send data to the past. You sent yourself a blank message as a test but as the email address you used to send it doesnt exist yet, it came up as no sender

I… what?

OKAY KIDS, LET’S LEARN ABOUT THE UNIX EPOCH

So back in the early days of computers, when we were trying to build clocks to keep all our computers in sync, we tried a bunch of different ways to synchronize them in ways that both normal people could use and programmers could utilize.

We just tried saying “The current time is THIS date” and just storing that date as some text, but while that was easy for humans, it was a bunch of different numbers that worked together in funny ways and computers don’t play nice with a bunch of random, arbitrary rules.

Not much worked, until we realized that we needed a BASELINE to compare against, and a way to represent the current time that covers everybody. So we came up with Unix time, because Unix was the style at the time. Essentially, Unix time represents any given time by saying “How many seconds ago was 12:00 AM on January 1, 1970 in Iceland somewhere?”. Recent enough to keep the numbers relatively small, far enough that nothing computer-y would fall before it, and consistent enough that there’d be no discrepancy based on where you are.

So what happens when you see the date “December 31, 1969” on a buggy message like this is that the computer received a bunch of zeroes by mistake and went “Oh, this must be a message!” Then when it tried to interpret it, it got to the date, found a zero, and said “Zero seconds since the Unix Epoch? I’ll round down - this was sent at the last second of New Year’s Eve, 1969! They’ll be so happy to finally get their blank message.”

And then the computer traipsed off on its merry way, because computers are fucking idiots.

222,887 notes

thatwasmeanish:

sunflowersforamy:

I wonder what would happen if somebody invented a video game wherein your vision is first-person camera and you never see a reflection or yourself or hear your own voice but you basically just have to do standard action game stuff and then at the end of the game it goes into third-person camera and BAM TURNS OUT YOU WERE A LADY ALL ALONG I would just be interested to know how that would be received by the gaming community

image

(Source: tournesolspouramy)

61,476 notes

So to push for better acceptance of gender equality, I (thought that I) made up the word “equalitarianism,” which has the exact same definition as equity feminism - all people should be treated as equals, etc. - without the stigma of the horrible alternate definition that everybody assumes you’re talking about when you say feminism. Then somebody on imgur points me to the word egalitarianism, and Wikipedia gives equalitarianism as a valid synonym with the exact definition that I gave it.

TL;DR: I independently invented a word and definition that already exist and I’m both super happy that I did it and kind of bummed that I didn’t actually think of it first.

"You say not all men are monsters? Imagine a bowl of M&Ms. 10% of them are poisoned. Go ahead. Eat a handful. Not all M&Ms are poison. #YesAllWomen"

That’s not only a terrible analogy (the only solution here would be to stay away from M&Ms forever), but really offensive and does nothing but spread fear.

Let’s change it up and see if it still usable:

"You say that not all black people are criminals? Imagine a bowl of M&Ms. 10% of them are poisoned. Go ahead. Eat a handful. Not all M&Ms are poison. #YesAllWhitePeople"

"You say that not all Muslims are terrorists? Imagine a bowl of M&Ms. 10% of them are poisoned. Go ahead. Eat a handful. Not all M&Ms are poison. #YesAllChristians"

This is NOT the message you should be spreading. I don’t care that the original quote was from a man; that doesn’t make it okay.

It’s far too easy to forget that social isolation and intense loneliness can lead to feelings of worthlessness, which can lead to self-loathing, which can then be projected outward.

It’s easy to write off hearing about this because you’ve felt lonely before, but that’s like saying that you know what it’s like to have depression because you’ve been sad before.

Obviously I’m not justifying what happened, but I can see how it happened. Usually this sort of thing ends in suicide instead of homicide. Regardless, it’s always sad when it happens.

Learn the difference; it could save your life.

True story.

True story.